Cleveland, OH,
17
December
2019
|
13:33 PM
America/New_York

Hunger Network Food Rescue Joins Forces with MetroHealth to Fight Local Hunger

Hunger Network Food Rescue, a program leading the effort to reduce food waste and fight hunger, is joining forces with MetroHealth to get food into the hands of Clevelanders facing food insecurity.

Hunger Network Food Rescue is powered by Food Rescue Hero, an app developed by 412 Food Rescue in Pittsburgh, PA. The Food Rescue Hero app enables volunteers to transport fresh, perishable surplus food from grocery stores, restaurants and other retailers directly to organizations that serve food-insecure populations.

“Hunger Network’s mission has served the region for over 40 years, providing emergency food and hot meals,” says Jennifer Scofield, Hunger Network CEO. “We are grateful to expand those efforts with Food Rescue and partner with organizations like MetroHealth to meet the community exactly where they need us most.”

Food Rescue Heroes transport food to MetroHealth’s Broadway Health Center weekly. As the program expands, Hunger Network Food Rescue intends to also expand the partnership with MetroHealth and transport food to additional locations.

“Through Food Rescue, we’re able to expand our network beyond the 72 Hunger Centers we support.” Scofield says. “We now have over 70 nonprofit partners including head start centers, schools, community health clinics, shelters, and more.”

“We’re thrilled to add MetroHealth to our ever growing list of partners,” adds Stacy Soulimiotis, Program Director of Hunger Network Food Rescue.

With a staff of 7,700 that provides care at four hospitals, four emergency departments, more than 20 health centers and 40 additional sites throughout Northeast Ohio, MetroHealth is undoubtedly fulfilling their mission to lead the way to a healthier community through service, teaching, discovery, and teamwork. Since partnering with Hunger Network Food Rescue, MetroHealth has provided food to 298 people.

“This partnership allows us to help provide food for the people in our community who need it,” said MetroHealth President and CEO Akram Boutros, MD, FACHE. “We know food insecurity causes a variety of problems for families, from poor nutrition to stress. We are grateful for the Hunger Food Network’s work to make our community healthier.”

Both Hunger Network Food Rescue and MetroHealth share a strong commitment to building healthier communities. Working together, the organizations can create tremendous change.

“MetroHealth has a strong network of longstanding relationships and a well-established service model,” says Soulimiotis. “Meanwhile, Food Rescue has a strong community engagement model and last-mile delivery technology. Combining these strengths will super-power our impact and allow us to reach those who are food insecure here in Greater Cleveland.”

Since launching in November of 2018, Hunger Network Food Rescue has rescued 275,000 pounds of food from waste, a retail value of $687,500 and an equivalent of 150,000 pounds of CO2 emissions mitigated. Thanks to the innovative, people-powered technology, anyone with a smartphone and a little free time can be part of the solution.

To join Hunger Network Food Rescue’s fight against hunger and food waste, visit hnfoodrescue.org.

About The MetroHealth System

The MetroHealth System is redefining health care by going beyond medical treatment to improve the foundations of community health and well-being: affordable housing, a cleaner environment, economic opportunity and access to fresh food, convenient transportation, legal help and other services. The system strives to become as good at preventing disease as it is at treating it.

The system’s more than 600 doctors, 1,700 nurses and 7,800 employees go to work each day with a mission of service, to their patients and to the community. As Cuyahoga County’s safety-net health system, MetroHealth plays an essential role in the region, caring for anyone and everyone, regardless of an ability to pay.

Founded in 1837, MetroHealth operates four hospitals, four emergency departments and more than 20 health centers and 40 additional sites throughout Cuyahoga County. The system serves more than 300,000 patients, two-thirds of whom are uninsured or covered by Medicare or Medicaid.

MetroHealth is home to Cuyahoga County’s most experienced Level I Adult Trauma Center, verified since 1992, and Ohio’s only adult and pediatric trauma and burn center.

As an academic medical center, MetroHealth is committed to research and to teaching and training tomorrow’s caregivers. Each active staff physician holds a faculty appointment at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Its main campus hospital houses the Cleveland Metropolitan School District’s Lincoln-West School of Science & Health, the only high school in America located inside a hospital.

Knowing that good health is about much more than good medical care, MetroHealth has launched the Institute for H.O.P.E.™ (Health, Opportunity, Partnership, Empowerment), which uses a coordinated, collaborative and strategic approach to help patients with non-medical needs such as healthy food, stable housing and job training.

The MetroHealth Glick Center, a new 11-floor hospital, is under construction on the system’s main campus in Cleveland and is scheduled to welcome its first patients in October 2022. The billion-dollar project is the cornerstone of a wider neighborhood revitalization effort led by the system and its partners in the community.

For more information, visit metrohealth.org.