Cleveland, OH,
01
July
2020
|
10:18 AM
America/New_York

MetroHealth's Trauma and Burn Unit Physicians Share Safety Tips for Independence Day

At The MetroHealth System’s Level I Trauma Center, physicians see an increase in burn-related injuries during the summer. Due to the pandemic this year, more people are expected to stay home for Fourth of July celebrations.

Fireworks, campfires and propane grill use are common culprits for injuries but following a few safety tips might save a trip to visit our doctors.

We encourage following state and local laws regarding firework use. Even sparklers can cause flame and burn injuries. Always maintain close parental supervision. Unfortunately, MetroHealth typically sees about six burn and blast injuries every Independence Day holiday.

Propane grills and summer weather go hand in hand, but there are simple ways to keep safety first. Make sure all connections are working properly before use, clean your grill regularly to prevent grease buildup and keep the grill away from homes and structures while cooking.

Summer night bonfires can also turn dangerous very quickly. Remember to never use accelerants to ignite a fire, use fire rings or screens when available and drink responsibly since alcohol is often a contributing factor to burn injuries.

Fall injuries are also prominent for children during summer months. This includes falls from the bed, highchair, bikes and sports-related falls spanning all age groups.

MetroHealth physicians want to help make sure the holiday weekend is a safe, fun time for everyone. If there is an emergency, MetroHealth locations at Brecksville, Cleveland Heights, Parma and Main Campus will be open.

For smaller, superficial burns or questions about burn injuries, patients can call the outpatient clinic during business hours on Monday through Friday at (216) 778-1775.

About The MetroHealth System

The MetroHealth System is redefining health care by going beyond medical treatment to improve the foundations of community health and well-being: affordable housing, a cleaner environment, economic opportunity and access to fresh food, convenient transportation, legal help and other services. The system strives to become as good at preventing disease as it is at treating it.

The system’s more than 600 doctors, 1,700 nurses and 7,800 employees go to work each day with a mission of service, to their patients and to the community. As Cuyahoga County’s safety-net health system, MetroHealth plays an essential role in the region, caring for anyone and everyone, regardless of an ability to pay.

Founded in 1837, MetroHealth operates four hospitals, four emergency departments and more than 20 health centers and 40 additional sites throughout Cuyahoga County. The system serves more than 300,000 patients, two-thirds of whom are uninsured or covered by Medicare or Medicaid.

MetroHealth is home to Cuyahoga County’s most experienced Level I Adult Trauma Center, verified since 1992, and Ohio’s only adult and pediatric trauma and burn center.

As an academic medical center, MetroHealth is committed to research and to teaching and training tomorrow’s caregivers. Each active staff physician holds a faculty appointment at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Its main campus hospital houses the Cleveland Metropolitan School District’s Lincoln-West School of Science & Health, the only high school in America located inside a hospital.

Knowing that good health is about much more than good medical care, MetroHealth has launched the Institute for H.O.P.E.™ (Health, Opportunity, Partnership, Empowerment), which uses a coordinated, collaborative and strategic approach to help patients with non-medical needs such as healthy food, stable housing and job training.

The MetroHealth Glick Center, a new 11-floor hospital, is under construction on the system’s main campus in Cleveland and is scheduled to welcome its first patients in October 2022. The billion-dollar project is the cornerstone of a wider neighborhood revitalization effort led by the system and its partners in the community.

For more information, visit metrohealth.org.